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National & World Texas hospital apologizes for incorrectly diagnosing Ebola patient in September Texas hospital apologizes for incorrectly diagnosing Ebola patient in September
The chief executive in charge of the Texas Presbyterian Hospital, where Ebola patient Thomas Duncan's symptoms were incorrectly diagnosed, issued a public apology.

A full-page ad appeared in the Sunday editions of the Dallas Morning News and Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspapers. In the letter, c-e-o Barclay Berdan said Texas Presbyterian "made mistakes in handling this very difficult challenge."
National & World Police: Remains found outside Charlottesville could belong to missing UVA student Police: Remains found outside Charlottesville could belong to missing UVA student
Authorities in Charlottesville, Virginia are still waiting for confirmation on whether the human remains found Saturday belong to Hannah Graham, the University of Virginia student who disappeared five weeks ago.

Police continued to search the rural area a dozen miles outside Charlottesville where they made the disturbing discovery.

Oregon State prof wins Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication

Jane Lubchenco, the University Distinguished Professor and Advisor in Marine Studies at Oregon State University. (Photo courtesy of Oregon State University)

Climate One at The Commonwealth Club on Thursday announced that Jane Lubchenco, the University Distinguished Professor and Advisor in Marine Studies at Oregon State University and former NOAA administrator, will receive the fourth annual Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication.

The $10,000 award is given to a natural or social scientist who has made extraordinary scientific contributions and communicated that knowledge to a broad public in a clear and compelling fashion. It was established in memory of Stephen H. Schneider, a pioneer in the field of climatology.

During her tenure with NOAA, Lubchenco helped lead the nation through the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, 770 tornadoes, 70 Atlantic hurricanes, six major floods, three tsunamis, historic drought and wildfires, prolonged heat waves and record snowfalls and blizzards.

Totem poles back at Oregon Zoo

Totem poles back at Oregon Zoo
Loesy, a totem pole restored by the artist and installed at the Oregon Zoo. © Oregon Zoo / photo by Michael Durham.

Two Native American totem poles that loom tall in Oregon Zoo history have reappeared on the zoo campus — newly refurbished, brightly painted and more striking than ever.

The totem poles — one crafted by Chief Don “Lelooska” Smith and another by father-and-son artists Rex and Ray Losey — have been at the zoo for decades, becoming familiar visual cues for visitors over the years.

They were relocated last year as the zoo began a major transformation, breaking ground on both Condors of the Columbia, which opened in May, and Elephant Lands — a sweeping expansion of the zoo’s Asian elephant habitat that will quadruple the animals’ space and dramatically enhance their daily experiences.

'Art of the Athlete' at UO museum; admission free this weekend

'Art of the Athlete' at UO museum; admission free this weekend
Artwork by Tony Washington

The “Art of the Athlete” exhibition returns for a third year  featuring work created by University of Oregon student athletes from participating in football, cheerleading and men’s basketball. 

Admission to the museum is free Saturday and Sunday, October 18 and 19.

Weekday football game affects parking at Oregon State

Weekday football game affects parking at Oregon State

OSU students, staff and faculty should plan ahead as parking on campus will be a challenge on Thursday, Oct. 16, due to a weekday home football game against Utah, beginning at 7 p.m.

One dental office reflects national breast cancer statistics

One dental office reflects national breast cancer statistics »Play Video

Michelle Johnson works at Oregon Family Dental.

"I was diagnosed on November 4, and I had to have a double masectomy," said Johnson.

Her co-workers were shocked but knew she'd find support through them, one of them a cancer survivor herself, Melissa Bain.

Little did the office know but another one of their co-workers, Mindy Moon, would be diagnosed just 3 months after Michelle.

"It's hard to see one of your staff go through it," said office manager Sandy Park, "but two of them go through that journey, it really impacted the office quite deeply."

Raging Grannies ask Eugene City Council to reconsider camping ban

Raging Grannies ask Eugene City Council to reconsider camping ban »Play Video

Nearly a half-year after Eugene closed the Whoville homeless camp, the local social activist group Raging Grannies asked city councilors to lift the city’s camping ban.

“If you don't have a place to sleep, you really don't have a place to be. I mean what happens is they're being arrested for sleeping which is a human necessity and a human right,” said Raging Granny Barb Prentice.

'The worst thing you can do in gardening in this area is leave your soil exposed for winter'

Right now, gardeners are still picking a few fresh veggies.

But as the nights get colder, it's time to plan for winter.

This week in the garden, we'll talk about some things you can add now to give your garden a boost over the winter.

Watch Joel in the Garden on KMTR NewsSource16 at 6 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Thursdays

12-year-old designing smart watch

12-year-old designing smart watch »Play Video
Kids these days have a lot on their plates. But one 12-year-old isn't just doing homework. He's busy inventing new technology. And his invention has some big-wigs in the tech industry interested. Brian Shrader has the story.

$250k smartphone has diamond encrusted case

$250k smartphone has diamond encrusted case »Play Video
Imagine a smartphone encased in white gold and encrusted with diamonds. That daydream could be reality if you have a cool 250-thousand dollars to drop on what's dubbed the world's most expensive mobile phone. CNN's Nina dos Santos has the story.