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Local Sit up straight! Your health may depend on it(Updated) Sit up straight! Your health may depend on it(Photo Gallery)(Video)
You wake up, drive to work and sit a desk all day.

Then you drive home and plop yourself on the couch all night.

If that sounds like you, your health may be at risk.

"A higher risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, being obese," said Debbie Proctor, a cardiac rehab clinical exercise physiologist.

"You get neck pain, you can get disc injuries, it contributes a lot to headaches, headaches are a big one that we see," said Travis Davis, chiropractor. "And then it also causes an imbalance in the muscles, so it contributes to continuing head posture."

These side effects can be pretty daunting - and can be caused by something you see every day: your office chair.

Watch #LiveOnKMTR at 5:30 and 11 p.m. Thursday, April 24, for more on this story

'We've mapped more landslides in the last five years than we did in the previous 60 years'

'We've mapped more landslides in the last five years than we did in the previous 60 years' »Play Video
The SLIDO map compiles data on known landslides in Oregon

State scientists have compiled 46,000 known landslides on a computerized database available online to Oregon resident.

"We've mapped more landslides in the last five years than we did in the previous 60 years," says Bill Burns, DOGAMI engineering geologist. "Land that has slid tends to slide again, so mapping landslide locations is critical."

The information is of potential interest to local governments, which govern land-use planning; and home buyers and property owners.

"It is going to become more of a thought issue because of what happened in Washington," said real estate broker Pam Rogers. "Unfortunately that was a sad situation and there have been some in california too so we are not obsolete from that happening here either."

Sit up straight! Your health may depend on it

Sit up straight! Your health may depend on it »Play Video

You wake up, drive to work and sit a desk all day.

Then you drive home and plop yourself on the couch all night.

If that sounds like you, your health may be at risk.

"A higher risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, being obese," said Debbie Proctor, a cardiac rehab clinical exercise physiologist.

"You get neck pain, you can get disc injuries, it contributes a lot to headaches, headaches are a big one that we see," said Travis Davis, chiropractor. "And then it also causes an imbalance in the muscles, so it contributes to continuing head posture."

These side effects can be pretty daunting - and can be caused by something you see every day: your office chair.

Watch #LiveOnKMTR at 5:30 and 11 p.m. Thursday, April 24, for more on this story

Getting big results from a small garden space

Getting big results from a small garden space »Play Video

Gardens in the Willamette Valley are getting a good drink of water this week.

But once the rain stops, more people will begin planting everything from flowerpots to green beans.

And you don’t need a big backyard to have your own green space.

Watch Joel in the Garden on KMTR NewsSource16 at 6 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Thursdays

Police: Call 911 if you see this man

Police: If you see this man call 911ROSEBURG, Ore. -- State police and the Douglas County Sheriff's office are looking for an armed and dangerous fugitive that they say eluded them west of Roseburg Wednesday.

Hiram Samuel Cunningham, 30, escaped capture and remains at large.

Authorities say Cunningham is known to carry firearms, and is wanted on numerous warrants out of Douglas, Lane and Jackson counties.

Officials say he is known to wear disguises, including a wig and reading style glasses, to avoid being recognized.  They also say he is potentially violent and has eluded police before.

He is described as a white male, 6'2" tall, 170 pounds with short brown hair and hazel eyes.

Authorities say if you spot the man, do not approach him; call 911.

Celebrating nine years of YouTube animal videos

Celebrating nine years of YouTube animal videos »Play Video
Nine years ago, the first YouTube video was posted online. Since then, billions of hours of video have been viewed on the site. But which ones did people really go *wild* for? Jeanne Moos takes a look.